Loving the One

Loving The One

If you spend time with me in person, you will very quickly discover the things I get passionate about. There are a number of them! But sharing the love of Christ with those that need it, both in practical ways and also meeting the needs of the heart; then looking at long-term solutions for every person to enjoy the fullness of life that God has created for us – those are biggies. I love the big picture, but also the details. I love cultures and nations, but also love the one, and sowing into a single life the love of Christ in whatever ways he opens up.

I’ve felt heavy of heart lately with the sheer enormity of the needs of people across our nation and the globe. The estimate of people currently in need of humanitarian assistance has risen from 82 to 102 million people just in the last 8 months. The scale and sometimes complicated circumstances around some of these situations can make it easier to turn away from, as it seems that what we can do is so little.

I realise I can’t change the world for every person, but I sure can for one. Every single life is worthy of touching with the love of Christ.  Love does not hold prejudice, or make a judgement on which life is more worthy than the next.  Love has to look like something that is more than words or good intentions.

I love this:

“I’ve noticed something about people who make a difference in the world: They hold the unshakable conviction that individuals are extremely important and that every life matters. They get excited over one smile. They are willing to feed one stomach, educate one mind, and treat one wound. They aren’t determined to revolutionise the world all at once; they’re satisfied with small changes. Over time, though, the small changes add up. Sometimes they even transform cities, nations, and yes, the world.” (Beth Clark in “Kisses from Katie”, by Katie Davis)

If I turned up on your doorstep and was in desperate need of your help, would you turn me away? Think about it. Picture my face. Imagine my children at my heels. Of course you wouldn’t. You’d invite me in. You’d meet the most immediate needs right then and there. You’d care for my children. If need be, you’d help me work out a plan for my future. You’d pray for me, hug me, and encourage me with hope.

And now imagine again, and this time picture this woman at your doorstep, with the same needs.

Photo: Annie Bungerouth/ACT-Caritas

Photo: Annie Bungerouth/ACT-Caritas

The fact is, there’s no difference between this woman and me. Other than the obvious cultural difference and geography, she’s a mother like me, she loves her children and wants to see them live the best life they can. She hopes that one day they will never have to worry about having enough to live. She wants them to have an education, and gain skills that will see them through life. I want this for my children too.

This women, and others like her, are not on my literal doorstep, but in a sense they are. We share the same earth under our feet, and neither of us chose where we would be born. I was blessed to be born and raised in a country without war and one with a ‘safety net’ via our Government should I ever need it.

Photo: Annie Bungerouth/ACT-Caritas

Photo: Annie Bungerouth/ACT-Caritas

Will you look at what you have in your hands today, and considering offering what you have to be Jesus’ hands and feet?

I’ve been tremendously encouraged lately by the work that Caritas have been doing worldwide, including in my own country.  They are working in almost every country, and when a crisis hits they are already on the ground.

Have a read about one place that has especially moved my heart recently, and pray about whether you can add your strength, resources, and prayer behind their efforts.

It just takes a little sacrifice, compassion, and willingness to partner with others.

“ With no husband I worry every day how I am going to cope; how I will pay for food, school fees and medicines for my children.” says Rawia*. Photo: Annie Bungerouth/ACT-Caritas

“ With no husband I worry every day how I am going to cope; how I will pay for food, school fees and medicines for my children.” says Rawia*.  Photo: Annie Bungerouth/ACT-Caritas

If you click through nothing else in this post, I would love you to read this one:  Darfur Voices: Vulnerable Families

Thanks for reading, and have a blessed week.

Victoria

And what does the LORD require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.
 – Micah 6:8

2 thoughts on “Loving the One

  1. Candace

    Victoria, Thank you for this compassionate post. I love the quote you referenced, too. I am happy to have returned to your site. It looks beautiful, and I am reminded how much I appreciate your kind-hearted and genuine voice. Peace to you…

    Reply

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